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Story idea: New labeling rules for sunscreen delayed
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By Lisa Glowinski
Penny Riordan manages digital content partnerships for GateHouse Media. She works out of the Center for News and Design in Austin. Prior to joining the company, she worked at Patch.com for four years, where she led social media, blogging and UGC ...
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Penny Riordan manages digital content partnerships for GateHouse Media. She works out of the Center for News and Design in Austin. Prior to joining the company, she worked at Patch.com for four years, where she led social media, blogging and UGC efforts for the company. She also launched a Patch site in Maryland. Penny has also worked as a reporter and editor at newspapers in Maryland and Connecticut.
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Flickr.com/Chrissy Polcino
May 16, 2012 12:01 a.m.


New labeling rules were to have gone into effect next month for certain sunscreens. While the deadline has been extended six months, it's still a good time to make sure readers know about summer skin safety



-- Lay out the changes readers will see in coming months when purchasing sunscreen: the claims "waterproof" and "sweatproof" will be replaced with "water resistant"; sunscreen will no longer be called "sunblock"; and bottles will no longer claim "instant protection" or that reapplication is not needed after two hours. Even though bottles purchased this summer may not be labeled with these changes, make sure readers know what to look for.



-- Today, the Environmental Working Group reveals its best sunscreens -- only a quarter of the 800 tested products made the grade. The group says those to avoid include products with oxybenzone and retinyl palminate, and to use products that protect against both UVB and UVA rays. However, not all doctors are on board with the recommendations -- ask your local dermatologists and oncologists what they recommend.



-- There is more readers can do to avoid sunburn and skin cancer this summer -- the CDC recommends staying out of the sun during 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., wearing hats, choosing wrap-around sunglasses that block UVA and UVB rays, and choosing sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. How can parents set good skin-safety examples for their kids, especially teens who may want to tan -- in the sun or in a tanning bed?

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