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A weekly guest blog written by GateHouse newsroom editors designed to provide insight into today's topics and issues facing the journalism profession.
AP Political Terms Style Guide
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By Michael Toeset
In Their Words is a weekly guest blog written by GateHouse newsroom editors. It is designed to provide insight into today's topics and issues facing the journalism profession and to add context as they relate to newsrooms. The authors will share ...
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In Their Words
In Their Words is a weekly guest blog written by GateHouse newsroom editors. It is designed to provide insight into today's topics and issues facing the journalism profession and to add context as they relate to newsrooms. The authors will share valuable best practices, content opportunities and advice on the many challenges facing our industry.
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In case you missed it, AP released a Political Terms Style Guide in December, and you’ll want to keep it handy throughout this presidential election year. Here are some highlights from the guide:



- Congress, congressional: Capitalize when referring to the U.S. Senate and House together. The adjective is lowercase unless part of a formal name.



- convention: Capitalize in a formal name: Republican National Convention, Democratic National Convention; otherwise lowercase: the convention.



- Election Day, election night: The first term is capitalized, the second is lowercase.



- front-runner: Candidate who leads a political race; the term is hyphenated.



- majority leader, minority leader: Capitalize as formal legislative title before a name: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, otherwise lowercase.



- president, vice president: Capitalize these titles before names; lowercase in other uses.



- primary, primary day: Both are lowercase, including when used with a state: New Hampshire primary.



- re-elect, re-election: Both are hyphenated.



- tea party: Lowercase the populist movement that opposes the Washington political establishment. Adherents are tea partyers. Formally named groups in the movement are capitalized: Tea Party Express.



*****



In other political news: You’ve probably seen Kim Jong Un spelled and hyphenated a variety of ways, but AP style is to treat his name as they did his father’s: no hyphen and capitalized - Kim Jong Un.



 

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